Bill Diefenbach

Specialist

"My interest in all aspects of architecture—from design to technology to engineering to management—provides the balance that most clients are looking for."

Bill's successful architecture career began at age 17, with a summer job at SmithGroupJJR's predecessor, Smith, Hinchman and Grylls. Bill's expertise has grown right along with the firm. He served as the design principal for many of our most highly regarded, high-technology projects, including the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Molecular Foundry. He deftly distills a wide range of input and can identify a common ground that serves all facets of a project. "I think my interest in all aspects of architecture—from design to technology to engineering to management—provides the balance that most clients are looking for," he suggests. "With our commitment to holistic architecture, it's probably why I am well-suited to SmithGroupJJR, too." He's also well-suited to Northern California, where he revels in the beauty of the hilly backroads of Sonoma County from the driver's seat of his 1978 Porsche 911 Targa.

Specialty
Design Leader, Research Facilities

Recognition
American Institute of Architects, College of Fellows (2007)

Professional Credentials
American Institute of Architects, Fellow (FAIA), LEED Accredited Professional, Building Design + Construction (LEED AP BD+C)

Contact
E Bill.Diefenbach@smithgroupjjr.com
P 415.365.3454
LinkedIn profile



Community Involvement

Bill has been responsible for all of the maintenance, renovation, and seismic upgrade of his church, St. Luke’s, for the past 30 years. Following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, the church was damaged and yellow tagged. Bill developed the first of many upgrades to improve the seismic resistance of the church by tying the outer aisle unreinforced masonry walls to the primary structural steel of the nave walls with 24 steel rods, each measuring two inches in diameter and 10 feet long. Subsequent projects have included design improvements to add structural steel to the organ loft—which houses over 2000 organ pipes within a tower structure—addition of a new slate roof with copper flashing and gutters, and more.